September 30, 2014

Olema cemetery


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photo by Donald Kinney

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photo by Donald Kinney

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photo by Donald Kinney

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photo by Donald Kinney

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Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 3 will be available October 1
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Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 1

September 29, 2014

swaddled in fog, basking in fog


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photo by Donald Kinney

Merely a thin veil of fog; but one her favorite garments.



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photo by Donald Kinney

Serpentine; she has vast quantities of the green semi-precious stone.



Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 3 will be available October 1
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Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 1

September 28, 2014

a guiding light to the bay


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photo by Donald Kinney

More than 300 boats ran aground near the Golden Gate during the Gold Rush years. One shipwreck, the SS City of Rio deJaneiro, is just a few hundred feet offshore from the light near the tip of that finger of rock.



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photo by Donald Kinney

Point Bonita was the last manned lighthouse on the California coast. This is the entrance to San Francisco Bay in the Marin Headlands, west of Sausalito.



Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 3 will be available October 1
Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 2
Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 1

September 27, 2014

background of sky, background of bay


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photo by Donald Kinney

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photo by Donald Kinney

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photo by Donald Kinney

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photo by Donald Kinney

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Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 3 will be available October 1
Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 2
Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 1

September 26, 2014

Morning stillness at Rush Creek


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photo by Donald Kinney

The stillness of the morning at Rush Creek, near Novato, California.



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photo by Donald Kinney

Perfectly balanced. A quiet duality. Perhaps a sense of completeness.



Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 3 will be available October 1
Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 2
Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 1

September 25, 2014

colors of sunrise light -- orange and blue


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photo by Donald Kinney

Nicasio in the morning. Can't think of a finer place. West Marin County. Nicasio Reservoir is managed by Marin Municipal Water District; serving as our emergency backup reservoir, one of 6 other reservoirs in Marin;
Phoenix Lake, Lake Lagunitas, Bon Tempe, Alpine, Kent Lake, and Soulajule. Drought has dramatically lowered the level of Nicasio Reservoir (above).



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photo by Donald Kinney

Apparently, this group of pilings had been a ferry landing at one time. I'm guessing it dates from the 1920's. The Golden Gate Bridge was not finished being built until 1937, and the Bay Bridge was not completed until 1936; so there was a lot of boat travel on this upper thumb of San Francisco Bay. Cars and people crossed the bays in and on ferries before the bridges.


lets get my "stats" up -- please tell your photo-loving friends about AphtoAday. If you have a blog, link to me and I'll reciprocate.

Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 3 will be available October 1
Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 2
Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 1

September 24, 2014

view from Mt. Vision, Point Reyes National Seashore


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photo by Donald Kinney

And what a view it is! This snap was taken from the appropriately named Mount Vision. On a clear day we can see for miles. That is Drake's Bay on the left, Drake's Estero in the foreground, with the Point Reyes Lighthouse at lower center on top of that mountain of rock. Chimney Rock area is that finger of land on the left.

There has always been a controversy as to where Sir Francis Drake actually landed along the coast of California but recently the federal government has quietly ended a 433-year-old historical controversy by officially recognizing a cove as the site where the famous explorer landed in 1579 and claimed California for England. [more information? click on this: sfgate.com]



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photo by Donald Kinney

Cars are only allowed about half-way to the top of Mt. Vision. I stopped along the way in the thick pine forest filled with ferns, endless pine needles, berry vines, red fruited bushes, shiny leaved bushes, moss, a little bit of poison oak, and what looked to be a healthy eco-system--with a plethora of birds and other vertebrates. At one point a coyote was rather reluctant in getting out of my way. Some day I'll make it to the very top on foot. A 360 degree view. Not an easy hike, but sounds like a plan.

lets get my "stats" up -- please tell your photo-loving friends about AphtoAday. If you have a blog, link to me and I'll reciprocate.

Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 3 will be available October 1
Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 2
Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 1

September 23, 2014

along Fairfax to Bolinas Road


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photo by Donald Kinney

Sometimes I feel like the luckiest fellow on earth. Lets face it--who deserves to live amidst such splendor? Who deserves to be alive at all? Yet, all I have to do is hop on over to the other side of town and gaze up at our beloved mountain--the centerpiece of our fabulous Marin County--and call it home.



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photo by Donald Kinney

Hollywood likes to visit Marin County. This past year we have had an endless stream of films being shot here. And if you watch any amount of television you've probably seen Mount Tamalpais and her two dramatic roads; Ridgecrest Boulevard and Fairfax-to-Bolinas Road being used as a backdrop for countless automobile commercials.



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photo by Donald Kinney

This last photo at Lily Lake is not new--taken in January 2009. I probably don't need to re-invent the wheel so here is what I wrote on the blog then:
I was going to save this for Valentine's Day, but here you go...

If you ever were to do some exploring on the Bolinas-to-Fairfax Road on the northern flank of Mount Tamalpais here in Marin County, you would find--amongst redwoods, fir, laurel, and madrone -- a little land-locked lake with no outlet until it overflows during Winter. You wouldn't find any sign, and I've never seen it on any map. Years ago I asked a friend what the name of that little lake was--with all the lily pads and frogs and horsetails on it's banks, and they replied: "Well, Don, who knows? I think they must call it Lily Lake".


Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 3 will be available October 1
Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 2
Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 1

September 22, 2014

the b&w vs. color dilemma


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photo by Donald Kinney

After using the photo [above] as the header yesterday I immediately knew s-o-m-e-t-h-i-n-g was wrong. When I looked at again later in the day I liked it even less. Usually I like ALL of my children [my photos] but this one began to cause me considerable consternation. Something was wrong--deeply wrong… If you need to see the color version again, click here.

My first thought was that it seemed too yellowish, and as a color image it probably was. But then I realized the sky was that sickening sky-blue color that I so truly dislike. I often wonder why God made the sky blue--maybe I should ask her. The sky-blue color had to go. The yellowish tinge had to go. I finally realized I needed to convert it to a black and white image.

Now, for those of you who aren't avid Photoshoppers, let me explain. With the click of one button the image went from sickening to sweet, but it still wasn't right. I needed to darken what was previously blue substantially--and with Photoshop that is as easy as moving a slider for that particular color. In the non-digital days I would have known to use a red filter on the lens--just like Ansel Adams would have done to get his rich dark skies. You see--the red filter would have absorbed the blue light, making it appear darker. Essentially, the computer and Photoshop do the same thing, electronically.



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photo by Donald Kinney

Now, this is NOT a black and white. It has some subtle but beautiful [I think] shades of green moss on those tree trunks. To convert this into a black and white would have been a travesty. The photo speaks; "moss". If I had I converted it to a black and white it would have spoken; "blah".

That concludes your Photoshop lesson for today. Take the rest of the day off. Best regards, Don


Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 3 will be available October 1
Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 2
Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 1

September 21, 2014

morning fog, way out behind Petaluma


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photo by Donald Kinney

Petaluma, California, is a great little town; located about 30 miles and a few massive traffic jams north of San Francisco on Highway One-Oh-One. Formerly, Petaluma was known for its chickens--most everyone on the outskirts of town had a chicken coop or two. Roosters crowed insistently and hens cackled excessively. The eggs were fresh! Everyone knew what would be on their plate come Sunday. Oh, there are still chickens--but mostly in horrid looking factory farms way out of town, down tiny and twisty roads that virtually nobody travels on but a few of the local birds.

Warm days and cool nights and a bit of humidity can generate copious amounts of fog. Fog also frequently creeps in from the Pacific Ocean, about 20 miles to the west--"as the crow flies".



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photo by Donald Kinney

This second photo is not new--it was taken in July of 2012 along the Petaluma-to-Point Reyes Road. I am hesitating to show a black and white image [top] in close proximity to a color shot--that is a definite "no-no" for photographers and artists who "follow-the-rules". But I say rules are meant to be broken. Pray for my soul… This bird might be going straight-to-hell.


Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 3 will be available October 1
Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 2
Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 1

September 20, 2014

the barn being restored in Pt. Reyes Station


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photo by Donald Kinney

In 2000, the National Park Service acquired the Waldo Giacomini Ranch for the purpose of wetland restoration. Part of the project is preserving what is known as the Wetland's Barn, the only remaining structure at the ranch.

Just to the west edge of Point Reyes Station is a tidal estuary where the Lagunitas Creek finally flows into Tomales Bay. The San Andreas Fault runs directly underneath this area, and the big quake of 1906 leveled most all structures in this small ranching town. The largest horizontal displacement--nearly 20 feet--occurred right here in Point Reyes Station.



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photo by Donald Kinney

Dramatic clouds were floating across the sky on Thursday. Truly a photo-snapper's delight. We received almost 3/8" of rain on Wednesday evening. Hopefully this is an omen of copious amounts to follow.



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photo by Donald Kinney

Cows don't do too well on slippery concrete floors so these grooves provided traction. This is a new floor, but as you can see it is already cracked.

The dual reversed image technique is an idea I've been experimenting with for a while now. A friend of mine and former co-worker, Omar Valdez, has been using a similar technique with his artwork for years. I swear I haven't deliberately ripped-off his idea, but who knows. Monkey see; monkey do? Hey Omar--maybe we can do a huge and fabulous show together some day?


Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 3 will be available October 1
Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 2
Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 1

September 19, 2014

the view from Point Cavallo, near Fort Baker


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photo by Donald Kinney

Come along with me, folks and I'll show you one of my favorite spots. You probably recognize the city. Locals birds like me just call it The City...



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photo by Donald Kinney

All three of these snaps were taken from the same perch. A vantage point called Point Cavallo. The Golden Gate Bridge isn't far away. Fort Baker is even closer.



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photo by Donald Kinney

Oh, I'll save the view of the Golden Gate Bridge from this spot for another day--I've got a good new one. Swinging the camera in the opposite direction is Angel Island; sometimes called the Island of Tears. Just like Ellis Island on the East Coast, Angel Island was an immigration station. A vast influx of Chinese stopped here first in the mid to late 1800's. Not everyone was allowed to enter the United States. A rigorous health and mental test was administered to determine if the immigrant would be allowed entry. Those who passed the tests ended up working more of less like slaves; building our railroads, levies, roads, and doing the hard and dirty work in the goldmines of the Sierra foothills. They also fished, farmed, sewed, and laundered a whole lot of our dirty clothes.

Discrimination was rampant; and backed by the law. A Chinese person was only allowed to work in certain, often undesirable occupations. The Chinese received low pay, couldn't vote and were second-class residents. With all due respect, we should all remember THAT, please; the next time we feel so damn proud of the history of our beloved United States of America.


Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 3 will be available October 1
Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 2
Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 1

September 18, 2014

"hallelujah" -- we have clouds in our sky


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photo by Donald Kinney

A cigar shaped cloud passing over Mount Tamalpais Tuesday afternoon.



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photo by Donald Kinney

Some folks will call this a "buttermilk" sky, but more might know it as a "mackerel" sky, getting its name from a resemblance to the speckled skin markings of the Spanish King Mackerel, the fish.





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photo by Donald Kinney

Sailors have used this cloud formation for centuries to predict the weather. An old nautical saying is; "Mackerel in the sky, three days dry".
[last image, sunrise over San Pablo Bay, is not new; taken Nov. 14, 2012]


Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 3 will be available October 1
Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 2
Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 1

September 17, 2014

Ed Ricketts -- John Stienbeck's "partner in crime"


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photo by Donald Kinney

Located adjacent to Monterey Bay Aquarium is this aging wooding structure; Pacific Biological Laboratories, Ed Rickett's business that provided marine specimens for study to educational institutions worldwide; 1923 to 1948.



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photo by Donald Kinney

Edward F. Ricketts (1897–1948) was an American marine biologist, ecologist, and philosopher. He is best known for a pioneering study of intertidal ecology; Between Pacific Tides (1939), and for his influence on writer John Steinbeck. In 1940 Ricketts and Stienbeck journeyed on a chartered fishing boat to La Paz, Baha California to collect invertebrates. This resulted in their collaboration on Steinbeck's The Sea of Cortez book, published in 1951.




In 1945, Steinbeck's novel Cannery Row was published. Ricketts was the model for "Doc" and instantly became a celebrity--tourists and journalists began seeking him out. Steinbeck portrayed "Doc" as a many-faceted intellectual who was somewhat outcast from intellectual circles, a party-loving drinking man, in close touch with the working class and with the prostitutes and bums of Monterey's Cannery Row. It is reported that Ricketts was not happy with Steinbeck's description of him, but he did admit the portrayal was honest.   [source: Wikipedia and Monterey Bay Aquarium]

Ricketts was also portrayed by Steinbeck as "Doc" in Sweet Thursday, the sequel to Cannery Row; as "Friend Ed" in Burning Bright; as "Doc Burton" in In Dubious Battle; as Jim Casy in The Grapes of Wrath; and as "Doctor Winter" in The Moon is Down.



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photo by Donald Kinney

Something I found rather interesting:   Ricketts also influenced Joseph Campbell (1904–1987); mythologist, writer and lecturer. This was an important period in the development of Campbell's thinking about the epic journey of "the hero with a thousand faces." Campbell lived for a while next door to Ricketts in Pacific Grove, and accompanied him on a 1932 journey to Juneau, Alaska. Like Steinbeck, Campbell played with a novel written round Ricketts as hero, but unlike Steinbeck, Campbell didn't complete the book.


Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 3 will be available October 1
Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 2
Donald Kinney Quarterly - volume 2014 issue 1
 
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